Tagged: rural

The politics of rural mental health

Yesterday I was asked to discuss rural mental health with some other rural health colleagues in the rural and regional electoral seat of New England in Northern inland NSW on local ABC radio. With Federal Election 2016 bearing down on us (July 2, 2016) we looked at some of the pressure points for health in the electorate. Here is the audio from our discussion… hopefully this makes a useful contribution to the local debate, and advocates for fair and reasonable mental health service distribution in rural Australia – especially for our young people.

Click here to listen – happy to hear others views as well. sunset tractor 'retired'

photo credit Above New England

The youth mental health reform roller coaster: Tickets on sale now!

In Australia, moves are afoot to review and implement changes to the mental health services and programs on offer – including those offered to young people. Change always produces some tensions, and that will be the case again in this situation… but something had to give… change was needed to see equitable improvements, and none more obvious than for rural young people with mental health problems. So here we go  – join me on the slippery slope of mental health care reform roller coaster!

The media have labelled the staged funding reductions to early psychosis services as “Futures will be lost. Health fears as youth pychosis program dropped”  Read about it here: http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/futures-will-be-lost-health-fears-as-youth-psychosis-program-dropped-20160429-goi1hu.html

This begs more questions: The  future of who…? Who will be advantaged…? And, who will be disadvantaged…? How do we achieve fairer and more equitable care for all of our young people throughout Australia? There are no easy answers or solutions… to suggest there are is to reveal a flippant disregard for the complexity of meeting the mental health needs of young people today.

I’m an optimist…

I hope that the government have got this right… and that a redistribution of youth psychosis program money will benefit young rural people more equitably as a result… Of course, advocating for the equitable mental health needs of young rural people has been my long-term professional activity of mine! So, I can only hope that this new direction to send funds to the primary health networks  – will in fact work for rural and regional young people where the gaps are larger! There are some risks to note. For example, how will people be mobilised from their comfort zones to take up work in new geographical regions…? Will this be supported in the recruitment of appropriate servicing of populations? Will it really be equitable? Or just equal? Will health professionals be contracted using brokerage models as they are ‘commissioned’ for services? And, if they are, how will this new model ensure that health professionals are able to be fully employed at reasonable pay rates, in keeping with their level of expertise?  How will we mitigate the risk of under-employment of people in low population communities yet maintain equitable service levels? How will the ‘gaps be filled’?  Has this been fully considered?

equity-vs-equality

 

I don’t think that the new approach to funding of youth mental health care this is such a bad thing for rural and regional young people. I have been calling for a more equitable and inclusive distribution of the mental health dollar for many years now… (eg https://www.researchgate.net/publication/275340216_Rural_nurses_A_convenient_co-location_strategy_for_rural_mental_health_care_of_young_people )

… it has not always made me popular…

The harsh reality is that rural youth often have much longer durations of untreated mental illness, poorer access to mental health services and poorer prognosis as a result… And, the largely urban-centric models of specialist youth mental health care have not met the demands for rural youth with mental health care needs. Something needs to give a little… perhaps this new funding model will be it… But – it needs to explain how it will include nursing expertise to promote mental health among young people at its coreBecause, nurses are already there in all communities… and they represent a present resource that can be better engaged in primary care.

How will nurses be engaged in the primary mental health care of young rural people? The role of nursing in the models of care continues to be vaguely described at best in current strategy offerings… Only using nurses for managing chronic care (ie the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program) is a sure-fire for short-changing the mental health of young people… becasue… young people have simply not lived long enough to have ‘achieved’ chronic mental illness status… rendering them ineligible for government supported nursing care in the main! Thus, how will this new model of funding utilise the expertise of nurses to deliver primary mental health care to young people and mitigate the early identification and intervention end of the care spectrum problems? Remembering of course that nurses make up the largest proportion of  health professionals representing and the largest proportion of human resource for mental health service delivery throughout the country? Nurses need to be a large chunk of the journey towards successful new models of care – yet they seem to be overlooked in the latest iteration of change. Why?

I am not yet convinced the the Primary Health Networks will be the solution… but I am prepared to be open-minded about the possibilities… I hope we are seeing the beginnings of something substantially more useful than reshuffling deck chairs. I think closer federal collaboration with state health, education, family and community services and police/ justice services will bring more profitable benefits. But, while a two tier government approach persists in mental health service delivery (Federal and State/s), problems in administering equitable services will also persist with bureaucratic double-ups inevitable, ultimately soaking up some of the direct clinical and research spend potentials.

I agree with McGorry, that many gains have been achieved through the concentrating of specialist expertise in a small number of specialist services, and that it would be a shame to lose this. But, having built this considerable national human resource – if it were mobilised and dispersed across the country (for example,  the experts geographically relocated) this have a benefit of authentically redistributing the talent and in doing so benefit more people over time. Is it time to mobilise the specialist population for greater good in health service delivery? A question for health geographers and health ecologists to ponder. Will redistribution of funding trigger a wider set of conditions in communities such that mental health is more effectively promoted? I think that this is possible: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280134451_Rural_Mental_Health_Ecology_A_Framework_for_Engaging_with_Mental_Health_Social_Capital_in_Rural_Communities

It is not all bad news, a new model could bring with it ‘catch-up’ conditions to more vulnerable and harder to reach young populations who should have convenient access to local mental health support where and when they require it. The challenge is for mental health professionals to work together using digital technologies to bring us together, it is after all what we expect of our clients these days! That is, to be satisfied with e mental health/ telehealth and digital gateway (triage) delivery….

Perhaps health professionals will also need to adapt our practices in the ways that we work and collaborate with each other – building virtual centres of excellence rather than geographical catchments of excellence. In doing so, some castles will be dismantled – and new ones will emerge… shifts in the sands of time across the landscape of mental health service and evidence development and  delivery are inevitable.

It is clear that the health budget in Australia will never be able to fund sufficient levels of mental health service delivery for Australian young people – our present budgets don’t go near sufficiency. Finding ways to squeeze a few extra drops of oil out of the rag are always going to be critical… the challenge is out for mental health researchers to be prudent in devising ways in which we can continue to do more, with less, and for politicians and policy makers to take heed of evidence as it emerges… And finally, for clinicians to be ready to adapt to the changing times as they evolve. None of that is easy!

Relevant other links:

http://www.acmhn.org/news-events/mental-health-reform

http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/0DBEF2D78F7CB9E7CA257F07001ACC6D/$File/response.pdf

#NursesShareYourStethoscope in Rural NSW

Last week a Miss Universe contestant, also a nurse, told the world about her love of nursing – she dressed in a typical nursing outfit (scrubs and steth) ready for work… and … she was at the brunt of some very public ridicule for doing so.

The nursing world spoke out – a line had been crossed. Nurses are proud of their contribution to world health. Nurses contribute more human resource to world health care delivery than other other health profession. We use a multitude of tools to do that… just one of those tools is the humble stethoscope… We use it to listen to many parts of the body – to check and monitor functioning, and to assess when health is compromised. It is a basic tool that many health professionals use everyday. To be mocked for doing so is wrong… Nurses around the world have risen up and taken to social media with #NursesShareYourStethoscope .

Here is my contribution as I travelled through northern NSW and southern Qld – Australia over the weekend. I tweeted ‘selfies’ along the way to cheer on rural nurses everywhere – keeping rural people healthy 🙂 See more @RhondaWilsonMHN

A big shout out to rural nurses everywhere – but especially to the ones in the towns I travelled through on my #NursesShareYourStethoscope tour:

  • Armidale, NSW
  • Guyra, NSW
  • Glen Innes, NSW
  • Deepwater, NSW
  • Glencoe, NSW
  • Tenterfield, NSW
  • Ballandean, Qld
  • Stanthorpe, Qld
  • Warwick, Qld
  • Allora, Qld
  • Toowoomba, Qld

My challenge to all rural nurses everywhere: #ShowUsYourStethoscope !

#headspace & #MentalHealth reform for #rural Australian young people. #nurses #heretohelp

At the moment, the media is laden with calls for reform for youth mental health in Australia. My research informs the debate:

My research specifically addressed the problem of rural young people accessing mental health care. Following one Masters (Hons) and one PhD examination of the problem, I have formed some evidence-based views on ways forward: Here is an extract (Thesis Chapter 5: pages195-197) one that relates to headspace and the potential nurses have to be a more effective contributors to early mental health care if funds were redirected from headspace for a more equitable distribution to help young rural people:

         Implications for policy…

  • The national mental health strategy headspace, does not currently possess the capacity to be extended to every rural community in Australia. E-headspace does have some scope to contribute a useful component to a rural youth mental health strategy if rural e-mental health knowledge brokers are available in community rural nursing settings or Medicare Local centres to facilitate this strategy in the rural environment.
  • The headspace initiative should be reviewed by the Department of Health and Ageing with an aim to facilitate the redistribution of federal funds to include a contribution to the operational costs of rural nurses to act as e-mental health knowledge brokers for young rural people on a per capita basis, so that at least population-based equity of distribution of youth mental health financial resources is available in all communities, rather than, as is currently the case, restricted to one service centre in one regional community in the study site region.
  • Further reform of youth mental health services is required to ensure that rural young people have reasonable access to mental health services in keeping with international progress and development about youth mental health services that challenge the traditional paradigms of youth mental health service delivery (Coughlan et al., 2011, 2013). There is wide agreement in the literature that young Australian people are underserviced in early mental health care, and that for rural young people this circumstance is further amplified (Coughlan et al., 2011; Mendoza et al., 2013; Rickwood, 2012; S. P. Rosenberg & Hickie, 2013).
  • Rural nurses should be adequately funded to support e-mental health kiosks in appropriate community settings such as hospitals, multi-purpose health facilities, community agencies, schools and police stations. Rural nurses are able to collaborate with professionals from all of these sectors in such a way that collaboration of mental health helping and capacity building in rural communities is achieved and coordinated. The architects of health, social and law policy will need to accommodate the inclusion of new and innovative roles in the future. In particular, the function, role description of rural nurses, and specifically the role of rural community nurses will need to be expanded so that meaningful mental health help can be provided to early mental health help-seekers.

In press now:

Wilson, R.L. & Usher, K. (2015) Rural nurses: A convenient co-location strategy for rural mental health care of young people. Journal of Clinical Nursing. (in press April 2015).

#nurses #heretohelp

#mentalhealth #nurses #heretohelp

Last night the media revealed a government mental health report that highlights the need for improved funding of community based mental health services in Australia, triggering a diverse social media conversation about some of the pertinent issues.

Key highlights include people reporting:

  • barriers to accessing mental health care
  • major challenges when seeking mental health care for the first time
  • being turned away from mental health care when help was needed
  • suicides related to lack of timely access or followup to mental health care
  • the suicide rate has been largely steady in Australia for many years – a failure to reduce mortality
  • recognition that suicide is preventable – and especially so if we can improve access and point of care service delivery for mental health help seekers

A recommendation from the leaked report is reportedly that a significant investment be injected into improving community based mental health services. This is a good idea. It is not a new idea – there have been many advocates and voices bringing forth this suggestion. More mental health professionals at the the cutting edge – in primary health and in community health and other settings. More investment in helping young people – enabling their care, not inserting more barriers and waiting until they become so unwell that hospitalisation is the only choice. Community mental health care is a poorly funded and barely accessible – unless you get lucky. Luck is not a sustainable commodity on which to base the ongoing mental health of the population. The social media discussion is one that should generate some pressure to release the report to the public and to invite the public to generate new ideas to address the challenges of providing a fair, equitable and accessible mental health service to the population.

Here are some of the links to the recent social media conversation:

https://www.facebook.com/breakfastnews

http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2015/s4216497.htm

on twitter: https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&q=%23heretohelp&src=typd

Mental health nurses have a great deal to contribute to the development of improved models of mental health care delivery for Australia, and they need to leading and consulting in the current debate. Some are bring more prominence to the debate by reminding the community that mental health nurses are here to help, an that they should not be overlooked in the develop of new models, policy and governance. mental health nurses should be included as full members of committees that seek to bring progress and improvement to what many are terming a ‘broken service’ (mental health service). Using the hashtag #heretohelp , nurses are advocating for inclusion and for improvement. If you see a #heretohelp hashtag – consider retweeting it or sharing it to show support for mental health nurses.

Nurses do an amazing job working to care and prevent many deaths caring for people with a wide range of mental health problems. In our acute services they are working with people in crisis and restoring many people to health and wellness. Among health professionals – nurses are the great proportion of clinicians caring for people with mental illness. That position gives nurses an important perspective on the delivery of mental health care. Nurses need to be listened to, and their work considered carefully in future planning.

I am a mental health nurse, bucket loads of clinical experiences and plenty of research experience as well… I have published work that makes recommendations for improving the delivery of mentla health care to rural people… here are soem of my ideas and recommendations in this portfolio of papers: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rhonda_Wilson3

I am #heretohelp  – join me!

Australia addresses methamphetamine problem with a taskforce

Some good news this morning in Australia as the Government announces the setting up of a new task force to address the the health, social and justice problems associated with methamphetamine use.

Assistant Health Minster, Fiona Nash, says that the mental health problems associated with ice  use in rural areas is increasing. It is timely to be addressing this matter now

More detail here:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-04-08/tony-abbott-announces-war-on-drug-ice/6376492

Experiences of families who help young rural men with emergent mental health problems in a rural community in New South Wales, Australia.