Tagged: nurses

Ten Tips for a successful career…plus a one extra late edition!

Ten Tips I picked up this week from a very successful retiring academic colleague about securing a long and successful professional life:
1. “If you live long enough- things happen” – you’ll need endurance and tenacity
2. Make sure you can recognise luck when it comes along and don’t waste the opportunity it brings with it
3. Have broad interests – look beyond your own discipline and always be ready to learn
4. Travel
5. Networks are everything – build strong networks
6. Find innovative ways to manage difficult people
7. Choose your battles carefully – let some things ride…
8. Take risks…
9. For academics…Remember: Teaching pays the bills!
10. Be nice to people – listen to them… hear them… be quick to say thank you.

an 11th has been added by another highly regarded sage academic (retired) – Do not forget to privilege research and publication. Sequester time for this and guard it ferociously. So easy for it to be eaten into. Create research groups.

….and my observation to add to this list… wash all down with plenty of ‘faith’ and confidence in yourself/your abilities… and a moderate amount of Shiraz!

#headspace & #MentalHealth reform for #rural Australian young people. #nurses #heretohelp

At the moment, the media is laden with calls for reform for youth mental health in Australia. My research informs the debate:

My research specifically addressed the problem of rural young people accessing mental health care. Following one Masters (Hons) and one PhD examination of the problem, I have formed some evidence-based views on ways forward: Here is an extract (Thesis Chapter 5: pages195-197) one that relates to headspace and the potential nurses have to be a more effective contributors to early mental health care if funds were redirected from headspace for a more equitable distribution to help young rural people:

         Implications for policy…

  • The national mental health strategy headspace, does not currently possess the capacity to be extended to every rural community in Australia. E-headspace does have some scope to contribute a useful component to a rural youth mental health strategy if rural e-mental health knowledge brokers are available in community rural nursing settings or Medicare Local centres to facilitate this strategy in the rural environment.
  • The headspace initiative should be reviewed by the Department of Health and Ageing with an aim to facilitate the redistribution of federal funds to include a contribution to the operational costs of rural nurses to act as e-mental health knowledge brokers for young rural people on a per capita basis, so that at least population-based equity of distribution of youth mental health financial resources is available in all communities, rather than, as is currently the case, restricted to one service centre in one regional community in the study site region.
  • Further reform of youth mental health services is required to ensure that rural young people have reasonable access to mental health services in keeping with international progress and development about youth mental health services that challenge the traditional paradigms of youth mental health service delivery (Coughlan et al., 2011, 2013). There is wide agreement in the literature that young Australian people are underserviced in early mental health care, and that for rural young people this circumstance is further amplified (Coughlan et al., 2011; Mendoza et al., 2013; Rickwood, 2012; S. P. Rosenberg & Hickie, 2013).
  • Rural nurses should be adequately funded to support e-mental health kiosks in appropriate community settings such as hospitals, multi-purpose health facilities, community agencies, schools and police stations. Rural nurses are able to collaborate with professionals from all of these sectors in such a way that collaboration of mental health helping and capacity building in rural communities is achieved and coordinated. The architects of health, social and law policy will need to accommodate the inclusion of new and innovative roles in the future. In particular, the function, role description of rural nurses, and specifically the role of rural community nurses will need to be expanded so that meaningful mental health help can be provided to early mental health help-seekers.

In press now:

Wilson, R.L. & Usher, K. (2015) Rural nurses: A convenient co-location strategy for rural mental health care of young people. Journal of Clinical Nursing. (in press April 2015).

#nurses #heretohelp

Top 5 reasons I’ll follow you on Twitter

Top 5 reasons I’ll follow you on Twitter.

Check out this blog ^ by Research Whisper … Twitter is a fantastic resource – but yes, you have to invest something of yourself into it to make it work…

The only point of difference for me is I am perhaps a bit more flexible with my following decisions. I am happy to follow back novice twitter nurses in particular, to assist with introducing them to nursing colleagues in the Twittersphere. Just like IRL (in real life), networking relies on investing some relationship and by gaining introductions to key stakeholders. My followship is substantial enough to enable me to ‘play nice’ enough to give others a hand along the way. So – if you appear authentic after I run my checks, and you are interested in conversations about #nursing #mentalhealth #ruralhealth #Indigneoushealth #wellbeing #research #academic #HDR … and your not trying to flog me your latest commercial book or product, or your not trying to sell me (or my followers) something – I will probably follow up back! What I will be very interested in is sharing knowledge, transferring health knowledge to real people and situations – so I will always be keen to promote scholarship (peer reviewed) whether it is mine or others. Why? Because I think it is critical to get new ideas out in the public domain – so ideas about improving the world get out where they matter… accessible to the general public and part of the conversation…

Let’s tweet!

writing course – structuring the Results/Discussion Section

If your trying to write… there are soem great tips on this blog link below… writing at an academic level – and especially for publication doesn’t come easy. It is a craft that needs to be carefully honed and fine tuned…. Reading others tips about ‘how to’ is always a useful part of the learning and fine tuning process…

Nurses (traditionally) have not been keen academic writers – but that is slowly changing. We need to publish (at a high level) what it is we do, how we do it, and our evidence to support the way we do things… I challenge nurses everywhere to give it a go… write when you can. Share your knowledge… please!

 

writing course – structuring the Results/Discussion Section.

Visiting mental health professional in rural communities: What happens when they go back home?

A poster presentation:

Wilson, R. L., & Usher, K. (2014). Mental health professional visitors in rural communities: What happens when they go back home? Paper presented at the ACMHN 40th International Mental Health Nurses Conference, Soffitel Melbourne.

ACMHN Rural MH visitors poster 2014 Wilson & Usher (1)

Open access journal papers about health & social media

Thanks for the Collegian, a nursing journal, who are taking the lead with a discussion about social media and health with open access on recent journal papers by my colleagues and I – here they are for your easy click and free download:

Nurses and Twitter

and 

Australian health profession students use of social media

Let us know what you think!